Bush-meat
 
MORE NEWS ON EBOLA VIRUS
Bush meat is a known a delicacy in many parts of Nigeria. Indeed, many Nigerians cannot forget in a hurry its delicious aroma and taste in native soups, such as Egusi, Efo and Ofe Isla.

Game meats are usually free-range animals, which mean they have less saturated fat, which makes them healthier than other fatty meats. They are also low in calories when compared with beef and chicken.

Bush meat is high in Eicosapentaenoic acid, an essential omega-3 fatty acid that has several cardiovascular benefits.
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        THE THREAT OF EBOLA VIRUS!

Bush meat” is any kind of meat that poachers bring out of “the bush,” forest and brushlands of Africa, especially central Africa.

The Ebola virus causes Ebola hemorrhagic fever. It is one of the most frightening of all epidemics because of its symptoms, high mortality (30 to 90 %) , and current expansion that is breaking out of control. Ebola continues to spread through central African counties, and the total known mortality now exceeds a thousand.

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  Oh Beware! Reports say Ebola virus may be contacted from    eating bush meat

Indeed, bush meats from fruit bats, monkey, Chimpanzee, among others are well sought after meat delicacies across Nigeria. But the Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) on Monday warned that increasedefforts are needed to improve awareness among rural communities in West Africa about the risks of contracting the Ebola virus from eating certain wildlife species including fruit bats.
 Ebola virus may be contacted from eating bush meat

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          STILL ON THE OUTBREAK OF EBOLA VIRUS ! WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
The world’s worst Ebola outbreak was likely begun by a hunter shooting a fruit bat for their dinner or the market, according to the UN. The outbreak has killed over 660 people in six months to date, and recently spread via plane to Nigeria. The disease is particularly deadly with a mortality rate of around 90 percent.

“We are not suggesting that people stop hunting altogether, which isn’t realistic,” said FAO Chief Veterinary Officer Juan Lubroth this month. “But communities need clear advice on the need not to touch dead animals or to sell or eat the meat of any animal that they find already dead. They should also avoid hunting animals that are sick or behaving strangely, as this is another red flag.”

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